The Parables of Jesus # 5
Good Samaritan
Luke 10:25-37


Luke 10:25-29
  25. And, behold, a certain lawyer stood up, and tempted him, saying, Master, what shall I do to inherit eternal ife?
  26. He said unto him, What is written in the law? how readest thou?
  27. And he answering said, Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy
        strength, and with all thy mind; and thy neighbor as thyself.
  28. And he said unto him, Thou hast answered right: this do, and thou shalt live.
  29. But he, willing to justify himself, said unto Jesus; and who is my neighbor?
  25. And, behold, a certain lawyer stood up, and tempted him, saying, Master, what shall I do to inherit eternal life?
 
  [A] A certain lawyer
         [1] A lawyer in the time of Jesus was different than what we think of as a lawyer today.
         [2] A lawyer in the time of Christ was one who professed to be well skilled in the laws of Moses; and whose
                  business it was to explain them.
 [B] Tempting Jesus
         [1] The lawyer, pretending to desire Jesus to instruct him, rose up and began questing Jesus
         [2] He did so to perplex Christ, or if possible, to cause him to contradict something in the law.
 [C] His question was – What shall I do to inherit eternal life?
         [1] This was a good question, but fortunately, Jesus knew what he was up to so she answered the question with
                  a question of his own.

Verse 26. He said unto him, What is written in the law? how readest thou?
 
  [A] Knowing that this man was a lawyer, one who was supposed to know the law of Moses, Jesus asked
          [1] What is written in the law.
          [2] How do you read what was written – or in other words, how do you explain it, after all that’s what you profess
                  to be able to do.
 
  [B] Jesus referred the lawyer to the law, and asked him what was said there.  
          [1] The lawyer was doubtless trying to justify himself by obeying the law.  
          [2] He trusted in his own works.
          [3] To show him the truth in the law,
                  [a] Jesus showed him what the law required, and thus showed him that he needed a better righteousness
                          than his own.

Verse 27. And he answering said, Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all
  thy strength, and with all thy mind; and thy neighbor as thyself.
 
  [A] He answering Jesus quoted the law
 
  [B] If you remember, this is what Jesus said was the greatest commandment, and the second gretest

Verse 28. And he said unto him, Thou hast answered right: this do, and thou shalt live.
 
  [A] The comment Jesus gave him, did not satisfy the lawyer - Thou hast answered right: this do, and thou shalt live.
 
  [B] Questions
          [1] What did Jesus mean by this?
          [2] What does it mean to love the lord with all your heart?
          [3] What does it mean to love your neighbor as yourself?
          [4] What did Jesus mean when he said, do this and thou shall live?

Verse 29. But he, willing to justify himself, said unto Jesus; And who is my neighbor?

  [A] In order not to look bad, the lawyer asked: Who is my Neighbor?

Matthew 10:30-37 – The parable of the “Good Samaritan”
  30. And Jesus answering said, A certain man went down from Jerusalem to Jericho, and fell among thieves, which   
        stripped him of his raiment, and wounded him, and departed, leaving him half dead.
  31. And by chance there came down a certain priest that way: and when he saw him, he passed by on the other
        side.
  32. And likewise a Levite, when he was at the place, came and looked on him, and passed by on the other side.
  33. But a certain Samaritan, as he journeyed, came where he was: and when he saw him, he had compassion on
        him,
  34. And went to him, and bound up his wounds, pouring in oil and wine, and set him on his own beast, and
        brought him to an inn, and took care of him.
  35. And on the morrow when he departed, he took out two pence, and gave them to the host, and said unto him,
        Take care of him; and whatsoever thou spendest more, when I come again, I will repay thee.
  36. Which now of these three, thinkest thou, was neighbour unto him that fell among the thieves?
  37. And he said, He that shewed mercy on him. Then said Jesus unto him, Go, and do thou likewise.

Verse 30. And Jesus answering said, A certain man went down from Jerusalem to Jericho, and fell among thieves, which
  stripped him of his raiment, and wounded him, and departed, leaving him half dead.
 
  [A] Jesus answering said.
          [1] Jesus answered him in a much different way than he expected.
          [2] Jesus made the lawyer become his own judge in this case, and made him to admit to something he at first
                  he would have denied.
          [3] He compelled the lawyer to acknowledge that a Samaritan--of a race most hated of all people by the Jews--
                  had shown the kindness of a neighbor, while a priest and a Levite had denied kindness and compassion
                  their own countrymen.
 
  [B] From Jerusalem to Jericho.  
          [1] Jericho was located about 15 miles to the north-east of Jerusalem, and about 8 west of the river Jordan.
 
  [C] He fell among thieves.  
          [1] He fell among robbers.
          [2] These thieves were highwaymen,
                  [a] They not only took property, they endangered life as well.
          [3] From Jerusalem to Jericho the country was rocky and mountainous, and in some parts scarcely inhabited. It
                  afforded, therefore, among the rocks, a convenient place for highwaymen.  
          [4] This was a much frequented road.  Jericho was a large place, and there was much travel between Jericho
                  and Jerusalem.
 
  [D] The man was robbed, beaten and left lying along the side of the road, probably down over a bank, to Die.

Verse 31. And by chance there came down a certain priest that way: and when he saw him, he passed by on the other
  side.
  
  [A] While the man lay along the road, a priest happened by
          [1] It is said that not less than twelve thousand priests and Levites dwelt at Jericho; and as their business was
                  at Jerusalem, of course there would be many of them constantly traveling on that road.
 
  [B] One would have thought that a priest would have had compassion, yet he went to the opposite side of the road
          and passed the man.
 
  [C] Questions
         [1] Why do you suppose the priest refused to help the man?
         [2] Why would he have passed him by on the opposite side of the road?
         [3] What does this say about the priest?

Verse 32. And likewise a Levite, when he was at the place, came and looked on him, and passed by on the other side.
 
  [A] A Levite.
          [1] The Levites, as well as the priests, were of the tribe of Levi, and were set apart to the duties of religion.
          [2] The duty of the priest was to offer sacrifice at the temple; to present incense; to conduct the morning and
                  evening services of the temple, &c.  
          [3] The office or duty of the Levites was to render assistance to the priests in their services.
 
  [B] What did the Levite do when he came to the place where the man lay?
          [1] He came and looked at him
          [2] Than he too walked away
          [3] The bottom line is, he had no more compassion for the man than the Priest did. Both of them were guilty of
                  failing to help their fellowmen
 
  [C] One has to wonder
          [1] Why would he have look at the person, if he wasn’t going to help?
          [2] What would make a man so hard in his heart that he would look upon a person in need and refuse to offer
                  any help to them?

Verse 33. But a certain Samaritan, as he journeyed, came where he was: and when he saw him, he had
 compassion on him,
 
  [A] The Samaritans occupied the country formerly belonging to the tribe of Ephraim and the half-tribe of Manasseh.
 
  [B] The Samaritans were hated by the Jews. They had no dealings with them
          [1] The Samaritans were a mixture of races.
          [2] They were part Jew, and part gentile – they had mixed together when Israel was in captivity and were no
                  longer pure
 
  [C] What makes this parable so different is how a man who was considered an enemy helped a man when his own
          countrymen would not.
 
  [D] Questions.
          [1] What makes people become prejudice towards others?
          [2] What would cause someone to see a man in distress and do nothing to help him?
          [3] What does this tell us about the priest and the Levite?
          [4] What does this tell us about the Samaratin?

Verse 34. And went to him, and bound up his wounds, pouring in oil and wine, and set him on his own beast, and
 brought him to an inn, and took care of him.
 
  [A] Bound up his wounds and Poured in oil and wine.
          [1] These were often used in medicine to heal wounds.
          [2] Probably they were mingled together, and had a highly sanative quality.

  [B] How different his conduct was from the priest and the Levite!

  [C] From this parable, what does Jesus show us we should do for our fellowmen?
          [1] He does not merely say in general that he showed the man kindness, but he told how it was done.
                  [a] He stopped--came where he was --pitied him--bound up his wounds-- set him on his own beast—took
                          him to a inn--passed the night with him, and then secured the kind attendances of the landlord,
                          promising him to pay him for his trouble--and all this without desiring or expecting any reward.
                  [b] If this had been done by a Jew, it would have been a signal kindness;
                  [c] If it had been by a Gentile, it would also have been a great kindness;
                  [d] Because it was done by a Samaritan --a man of a nation most hateful to the Jews, and therefore it
                          most strikingly shows what we are to do to friends and foes when they are in distress.

Verse 35. And on the morrow when he departed, he took out two pence, and gave them to the host, and said unto
  him, Take care of him; and whatsoever thou spendest more, when I come again, I will repay thee.
 
  [A] When you see what the good Samaritan did for this man, what thoughts go through you mind?
 
  [B] When you see someone who has treated you wrong in need, does your heart go out to them?
 
  [C] Do you find it easier to help those you love, than those you dislike?
 
  [D] What truly amazes me about his Samaritan is the fact that his interest in the man did not stop when he took him
          to the inn, he spent the night caring for him, and then made arrangement for his care when he left the next day.
          [1] It’s not so hard helping someone once and then leaving them, what’s harder is making sure they are cared
                  for after you are gone.
          [2] It’s easy to send a little money to an organization or to put a little money in the offering plate at church, or
                  drop a little money in the kettle at Christmas. These things make you feel good, knowing that you have
                  done you duty. But is this enough? Does not people remain hungry after Christmas? Does not there
                  remain a need to reach out and help others throughout the year?
          [3]
James 2:14-18
                  14. What doth it profit, my brethren, though a man say he hath faith, and have not works? can faith save
                       him?
                  15. If a brother or sister be naked, and destitute of daily food,
                  16. And one of you say unto them, Depart in peace, be ye warmed and filled; notwithstanding ye give
                        them not those things which are needful to the body; what doth it profit?
                  17. Even so faith, if it hath not works, is dead, being alone.
                  18. Yea, a man may say, Thou hast faith, and I have works: shew me thy faith without thy works, and I will
                        shew thee my faith by my works.
          [4] Real love towards your fellowmen is when you get your hands dirty, and go above and beyond.  
                  [a] What do you think I mean by this?
                  [b] What did James mean by what we just read?

Verse 36. Which now of these three, thinkest thou, was neighbour unto him that fell among the thieves?
  
  [A] I ask you, which of these three  men, was the neighbor?
 
  [B] Who is your neighbor?

Verse 37. And he said, He that shewed mercy on him. Then said Jesus unto him, Go, and do thou likewise.

  [A] Who did he say was the neighbor?
          [1] He that showed mercy.
                  [a] His Jewish prejudice would not permit him to name the Samaritan, but there was no impropriety, even
                          in his view, in saying that the man who showed so much mercy was really the neighbour to the
                          afflicted, and not he who professed to be his neighbour, but who would do nothing for his welfare.

  [B] Jesus than told him, to Go, and do thou likewise.
          [1] Show the same kindness to all--to friend and foe--and then you will have evidence that you keep the law,
                  and not till then.  
  
  [C] From this parable we can learn:
          [1] Knowledge of the law is useful to acquaint us with our sinfulness and our need of a Saviour.
          [2] It is not those who professes kindness that really loves us, but he the person who will deny himself to do
                  someone good when they are in need.  
          [3] Our religion requires us to do good to all men, irregardless of how we become acquainted with their
                  calamities.
          [4] We should do good to our enemies. Real love leads to deny ourselves, and to sacrifice our own welfare,
                  that we may help them in times of distress and alleviate their wants.
          [5] Our real neighbor is he who does us the most good-- who helps us in our necessities, and especially if he
                  does this when there has been a controversy or difference between us and him.
          [6] Real religion can induce men to forget their prejudices, overcome opposition, and to do good to those who
                  are at enmity with them. True religion teaches us to regard every man as our neighbour; prompts us to do
                  good to all, to forget all differences  
          [7] The difference between the Jew and the Samaritan was a difference in religion and religious opinion; and
                  from the example of the latter we may learn that, while men differ in opinions on subjects of religion, and
                  while they are zealous for what they hold to be the truth, still they should treat each other kindly; that they
                  should aid each other in necessity; and that they should thus show that religion is a principle superior to
                  the love of sect, and that the cord which binds man to man is one that is to be sundered by no difference
                  of opinion, that Christian kindness is to be marred by no forms of Worship, and by no bigoted attachment
                  for what we esteem the doctrines of the gospel.