The Parables of Jesus
Persistent friend – Luke 11:5-8

Luke 11:1-13
    1.   And it came to pass, that, as he was praying in a certain place, when he ceased, one of his disciples said unto  
          him, Lord, teach us to pray, as John also taught his disciples.
    2.   And he said unto them, When ye pray, say, Our Father which art in heaven, Hallowed be thy name. Thy
          kingdom come. Thy will be done, as in heaven, so in earth.
    3.   Give us day by day our daily bread.
    4.   And forgive us our sins; for we also forgive every one that is indebted to us. And lead us not into temptation; but
          deliver us from evil.
    5.   And he said unto them, Which of you shall have a friend, and shall go unto him at midnight, and say unto him,
          Friend, lend me three loaves;
    6.   For a friend of mine in his journey is come to me, and I have nothing to set before him?
    7.   And he from within shall answer and say, Trouble me not: the door is now shut, and my children are with me in
          bed; I cannot rise and give thee.
    8.   I say unto you, Though he will not rise and give him, because he is his friend, yet because of his importunity he
          will rise and give him as many as he needeth.
    9.   And I say unto you, Ask, and it shall be given you; seek, and ye shall find; knock, and it shall be opened unto
          you.
    10. For every one that asketh receiveth; and he that seeketh findeth; and to him that knocketh it shall be opened.
    11. If a son shall ask bread of any of you that is a father, will he give him a stone? or if he ask a fish, will he for a fish
          give him a serpent?
    12. Or if he shall ask an egg, will he offer him a scorpion?
    13. If ye then, being evil, know how to give good gifts unto your children: how much more shall your heavenly Father
          give the Holy Spirit to them that ask him?

Verse one - And it came to pass, that, as he was praying in a certain place, when he ceased, one of his disciples said
    unto him, Lord, teach us to pray, as John also taught his disciples.

    [A] Our parable for tonight is on prayer, and was given to the disciples when they asked Jesus to teach them how to
            pray
    
    [B] The actual parable is found in verses five through eight, but to better understand it, we will be looking at a
            number of other verse as well

    [C] The disciples saw Jesus praying constantly –
            [1] He went off alone to pray
            [2] He prayed in their presence
            
    [D] John the Baptist taught his disciples how to pray, and the disciples of Jesus wanted to learn how to pray as well

    [E] Questions
            [1] How do we learn to pray?
            [2] What is prayer?
            [3] Why do we pray?

    I would like you to look at the Lords prayer found in Matthew six instead of the one here in Luke, as that is the        
prayer we are accustomed to praying. Keep your finger in Luke and we will compare both.

Matthew 6:9-13
    9.   After this manner therefore pray ye: Our Father which art in heaven, Hallowed be thy name.
    10. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done in earth, as it is in heaven.
    11. Give us this day our daily bread.
    12. And forgive us our debts, as we forgive our debtors.
    13. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil: For thine is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory,
          for ever. Amen.

    Luke verse two- And he said unto them, When ye pray, say, Our Father which art in heaven, Hallowed be thy
name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done, as in heaven, so in earth.

Matthew 6:9-10
    9.   After this manner therefore pray ye: Our Father which art in heaven, Hallowed be thy name.
    10. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done in earth, as it is in heaven.
    
    [A] Notice that there is a slight difference in the two prayers
            [1] Luke says “Thy will be done, as in heaven, so in earth.”
            [2] Matthew says “Thy will be done, as in heaven, so in earth.”
            [3] The biggest difference in found in the last verse, which we will talk about in a moment

    [B] The important thing here is how Jesus taught his disciples to begin their prayer by acknowledging God as their
            Father in Heaven and praising him – Hallowed be thy name

    [C] Secondly – he taught them to submit everything to God as they awaited and yearned for his kingdom to come
            [1] He didn’t teach them to pray that God would wait a little longer – he taught them to pray for his kingdom to
                    come
            [2] Not only were the to pray for the kingdom go come, they were to pray that God’s will would be carried out
                    here on earth just as it was carried out in heaven
                    [a] How do we know the will of God?
                    [b] When God wills something to take place, are we to accept it?
                    [c] Are we to pray that God’s will be changed to suit our own desires?

Luke verse three - Give us day by day our daily bread.

Matthew 6:11 Give us this day our daily bread.
    
    [A] When one asks God to give us this day our daily bread, what does that entail?
            [1] We are asking for just what we need
            [2] We are asking God to supply us with what he knows we need to sustain us, and nothing more
                    [a] If that means that we wonder around in the wilderness for forty years with only manna to eat, that’s OK
                    [b] If that means that all we have to eat is taters and beans, that too is OK
    
    [B] When one asks for daily bread, they are no asking for riches, or land, they are asking for just enough to make it
            [1] Why is this important?
            [2] Why didn’t Jesus teach us to ask for wealth and pleanty?

Luke verse four - And forgive us our sins; for we also forgive every one that is indebted to us. And lead us not into
temptation; but deliver us from evil.

Matthew 6:12-13
    12.  And forgive us our debts, as we forgive our debtors.
    13.  And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil: For thine is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory,
           for ever. Amen.

    [A] Notice the differences here,
            [1] Luke says forgive us our sins - Matthew say forgive us our debts
            [2] Luke says forgive us as we forgive everyone that is indebted to us – Matthew says, Forgive us as we
                    forgive our debtors
            [3] Both say “lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil”
            [4] Only Matthew says “For thine is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory, for ever.”
            [5] Which is the correct translation?
                    [a] Many of the new translation leave For thine is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory, for ever out
                            of Matthew, but make a notation that it was in the older text..
                            [1-a] My question is this, if it was in the older text, why leave it out of the newer?
                            [2-a] Is that not adding too and taking from God’s word
                    [b] Some claim that this statement was added later by the interpreters
            [6] What is correct?
                    [a] No-one knows, but it is my believe that Jesus said both prayers, just like it was written
                            [1-a] Matthew’s prayer was a part of the sermon on the mount
                            [2-a] Luke's prayer was a time alone with the disciples when Jesus was teaching only them
    
    [B] The bottom line is this, if we want to be forgiven of our sins, Jesus said that we were to forgive Others and we
            are to acknowledge to God that we understand this principle.

    [C] Life is full of temptation and strife – we are to pray and ask God to keep us free from temptation
            [1] Even the strongest among us, sometimes falls pray to temptation
            [2] Because we are weak, we must ask God to keep us from temptation
            [3] What causes temptation?
                   
 James 1:13-15
                    13. Let no man say when he is tempted, I am tempted of God: for God cannot be tempted with evil,
                          neither tempteth he any man:
                    14. But every man is tempted, when he is drawn away of his own lust, and enticed.
                    15. Then when lust hath conceived, it bringeth forth sin: and sin, when it is finished, bringeth forth death.

    [D] Matthew closes the prayer with another praise to God – it begins and ends in praise
    
    [E] What we experience by praying this prayer is a perfect prayer,

    You may close the bible on Matthew and urn back to Luke eleven again

Verse five - And he said unto them, Which of you shall have a friend, and shall go unto him at midnight, and say unto
    him, Friend, lend me three loaves;
    
    [A] And he said unto them,
            [1] Then Jesus proceeded to show them that, in order for them to obtain the blessing, it was necessary to
                    persevere in asking for it.
            [2] For this purpose he introduced the case of a friend's asking bread of another for one who had come to him
                    unexpectedly.
            [3] His design is to show the necessity of being persistent in prayer to God.

    [B] At midnight.
            [1] A time when it would be most inconvenient for his friend to help him; an hour when he would naturally be in
                    bed and his house shut.

    [C] Three loaves.
            [1] There is nothing particularly denoted by the number three in this place.
            [2] Jesus often threw in such particulars merely to fill up the story, or to preserve the consistency of it.

Verse six - For a friend of mine in his journey is come to me, and I have nothing to set before him?

    [A] You might say, this is a stupid thing that Jesus used to teach his disciples about prayer with but was it?
            [1] In the time of Christ, it was custom to feed someone when they came to your house, no matter what the time
                     was
            [2] If a traveler came to your house after traveling all day, he would be hungry
            [3] The man of the house had no bread to feed him therefore he was in dire straights
                    [a] His desire to have bread was not selfish
                    [b] His desire to the other man was for help in doing the right thing for his friend who had shown up on his
                            doorstep
                    [c] Jesus is teaching us that we must go to God for our needs, and God will hear us if we persist

Verse seven - And he from within shall answer and say, Trouble me not: the door is now shut, and my children are with
    me in bed; I cannot rise and give thee.

    [A] My children are with me in bed.  
            [1] This does not necessarily mean that they were in the same bed with him, but that they were all in bed, the
                    house was still, the door was shut, and it was troublesome for him to rise at that time of night to
                    accommodate him.
            [2]  The customs of Orientals differ in this respect from our own. Among them it is a common practice--for a
                    whole family--parents, children, and servants--to sleep in the same room.

Verse eight ¬- I say unto you, Though he will not rise and give him, because he is his friend, yet because of his
    importunity he will rise and give him as many as he needeth.

    [A] Jesus taught that we were to keep on asking, to keep on knocking on heavens door

    [B] Importunity – means to persist

    [C] Because we keep on persisting, God will answer and give us what we need.
            [1] Notice that it says what you need, not what you want

Verse nine - And I say unto you, Ask, and it shall be given you; seek, and ye shall find; knock, and it shall be opened
    unto you.

    [A] What does these words mean when thinking of prayer
            [1] Ask –
                    [1-a] God knows what we need even before we ask
                    [2-a] He expects and wants us to ask him for it
                            [a-1] Why is this?
            [2] Seek –
                    [1-a] When we ask God for something, we should expect an answer
                    [2-a] If we ask for rain, we should carry an umbrella
            [3] Knock –
                    [1-a] Not all prayers are answered immediately
                    [2-a] Sometimes we must continually knock at heavens door pleading with God for an answer        

Verse ten - For every one that asketh receiveth; and he that seeketh findeth; and to him that knocketh it shall be
    opened.

    [A] For every one that asketh receiveth
            [1] Every one that asks aright, that prays in faith, and in submission to the will of God.
            [2] He does not always give the very thing which we ask, but he gives what would be better.
            [3] A parent will not always confer the very thing which a child asks, but he will seek the welfare of the child,
                    and give what he thinks will be most for its good.
            [4] Paul asked that the thorn from his flesh might be removed. God did not literally grant the request, but told
                    him that his grace should be sufficient for him,

    [B] He that seeketh findeth
             [1] Not all answers come in the way we want them, sometimes God gives us an answer different than what we
                    pray
            [2] When one prays, they must seek the answer, they might already have the answer and did not see it, they
                    might be the answer, and they have failed to acknowledge it
            [3] Not only should we voice our petitions to God, we should also ask God to show us the answer as we seek
                    them.

    [C] To him that knocketh it shall be opened.
            [1] We have not, because we ask not
            [2] We don’t ask because we don’t really believe that God will give it to us
            [3] Unless we knock on heaven’s door and seek a blessing, chances are, we will not receive one

Verses eleven - If a son shall ask bread of any of you that is a father, will he give him a stone? or if he ask a fish, will    
  he for a fish give him a serpent?

    [A] When I think of God, and of how much he loves me, the only thing I have to compare his love too is my own
            parents.

    [B] I think this is what Jesus is telling us to do here.
            [1] What father, if his son asks for a piece of bread, will he give him a stone instead?
            [2] What father if his child asks for a fish will he give him a snake?
            [3] Parents try to give their children what they need, and if possible what they want.
    
    [C] Questions
            [1] Now, think of God, will he give you something that is going to hurt you?
            [2] If you ask for things that you truly need, is God going to deny you.


Verse twelve - Or if he shall ask an egg, will he offer him a scorpion?

    [A] Jesus goes on to asks if a father would give a scorpion to a child who asked for an egg
            [1] Of course we know that a loving father would never do something like this
            [2] A loving father would give his life for his child – or take his place
            [3] A loving father would go hungry so the child could eat
            [4] A loving father, would place the child’s welfare in front of his own

Verse 13 - If ye then, being evil, know how to give good gifts unto your children: how much more shall your
  heavenly Father give the Holy Spirit to them that ask him?

    [A] If then, we who are human, love our children this much, and are willing to give them what they ask for, how much
            more will the heavenly father give those he loves?

    [B] All this boils down to one thing
            [1] First -we must believe without doubting that God will hear us
            [2] Second – when we ask for something, we must ask believing that God wants us to have it.
                    [1-a] This means that we have to know what things God is willing to give
                    [2-a] It means that we cannot ask selfishly for anything
                    [3-a] It means that we have to be in God’s will and ask for God’s will to be done
                    [4-a] It means that we have to seek God’s will even before we ask him
            [3] Thirdly – like the man who went to his neighbor and asked for bread, we like him have to have a
                    relationship with God, we have to know him, and he us, before we start asking.
            [4] Forth – When we determine that it’s God’s will that we ask, we must begin knocking on heavens door,
                    seeking the blessings of God.
            [5] Sixth – If the answer does not come right away, we must keep on knocking in faith, believing that God is
                    going to answer us, until we get our answer.

    [C] For every one that asketh receiveth; and he that seeketh findeth; and to him that knocketh it shall be opened.